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A Quick Glossary For Some Words We Use A Lot In This Club

Note that the following definitions are specific to the S.C.A. These are just the ways we use these words in our club. You can find other definitions for most in the dictionary.

Kingdom:
An S.C.A. kingdom is a larger regional branch of the S.C.A. which serves a much larger area and contains many local branches, each of those with a group-type designation (such as Barony, College, Shire, and others) and its own name. [Capitalize the word when you are referring to a specific kingdom.]
Royalty:
Current Kings, Queens, Princes, and Princesses (see below, for more about each) are each Royalty and members of their own Kingdom's Royal Family. (To be clear, former Royalty are not Royalty; they were.) [By convention, pronouns referring to Royalty are capitalized (i.e. They, Him, Her, etc.).]
King, Queen:
Because it adds to the fun medieval flavor of our activities, all Kingdoms have two rulers who oversee the medieval aspects of the club's activities as well as some of the modern administrative ones. Male rulers are Kings, and Female rulers are Queens. There may be one of each, or two of either.
The Crown (of a kingdom):
The rulers of a Kingdom are collectively called its Crown. In the rare cases that a ruler dies or must step down before Their reign [a term] is complete, the remaining one remains, on their own, the Crown. [Of course, a crown is also the fancy metal headgear worn by a King or Queen; it is not capitalized in writing, and in speech, rely on context. By the way, in the SCA, other things that sure look like crowns are not called crowns; only those worn by a King or Queen are called crowns.]
Sovereign, Consort (of a kingdom):
The ruler who was the winner of Crown Tournament (see below) is called the "Sovereign", and the one for whom they fought is called the "Consort". [Basically the distinction is used for a few points in the club's rules, and occasionally for general interest.]
Crown Tournament, Prince, Princess (of a kingdom):
The Crowns of each Kingdom are chosen and replaced through regularly-scheduled tournaments of armored combat, called Crown Tournament, and each combatant always fights for another person (their consort, with a small c). After winning Crown Tourney, the winner and their consort will be officially recognized as heirs to the Crown. Male heirs are Princes, and female heirs are Princesses. There may be one of each, or two of either. At regularly-scheduled intervals, the current Crown step down to end Their reign, and then Their heirs step up to begin their own reign as Crown.
The Coronet (of a kingdom):
The heirs of a Kingdom are collectively called its Coronet (in similar fashion to the rulers being called the Crown). In the rare cases that an heir dies or must step down before Their reign [a term] is complete, the remaining one remains, on their own, the Coronet. In (this writer's experience of) practice, however, They are most often called "the Prince and Princess/Princes/Princesses" or "the Heirs". [By the way, in the S.C.A., A coronet is also what we call pretty much any fancy metal headgear meant to be worn by someone other than a reigning King or Queen; it is not capitalized in writing, and in speech, rely on context. Fancy metal headgear for Princes, Princesses, Barons, Baronesses, and former Royalty are called coronets. There are some plain metal circlets and headbands worn by others which aren't coronets. Again, these distinctions are "an S.C.A. thing".]
Barony:
An S.C.A. barony is, specifically, a type of local branch from whose populace the Crown has appointed one or two people to represent Them to the Barony and vice-versa. [Capitalize the word when you are referring to a specific barony.]
The Coronet (of a barony):
The Crown may choose to appoint a Baron, a Baroness, or both together, as Their representative(s) to a barony. And "the Baronial Coronet" (or "the Coronet", within proper context) refers to the appointed representative(s) in all of these cases.